CBT

CBT is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people's difficulties, and so change the way they feel. CBT rests on the idea that thoughts and perceptions influence behavior. Feeling distressed, in some cases, may distort one’s perception of reality. CBT aims to identify harmful thoughts, assess whether they are an accurate depiction of reality, and if they are not, employ strategies to challenge and overcome them. WHAT HAPPENS DURING CBT? Your Catalyst Counseling therapist will encourage you to talk about your thoughts and feelings and what's troubling you. Don't worry if you find it hard to open up about your feelings. Your therapist can help you gain more confidence and comfort. CBT generally focuses on specific problems, using a goal-oriented approach. As you go through the therapy process, your therapist may ask you to do "homework" — activities, reading or practices that build on what you learn during your regular therapy sessions — and encourage you to apply what you're learning in your daily life. Your therapist's approach will depend on your particular situation and preferences. Your therapist may combine CBT with another therapeutic approach.


MI

Motivational interviewing is a psychotherapeutic approach that attempts to move an individual away from a state of indecision or uncertainty and towards finding motivation to making positive decisions and accomplishing established goals. The therapeutic relationship for both motivational interviewers is a democratic partnership. Our role in motivational interviewing is directive, with a goal of eliciting self-motivational statements and behavioral change from you in addition to creating a discrepancy to enhance motivation for positive change.

The Catalyst Clinician practices motivational interviewing with five general principles in mind:

  1. Express empathy through reflective listening.

  2. Develop discrepancy between clients' goals or values and their current behavior.

  3. Avoid argument and direct confrontation.

  4. Adjust to client resistance rather than opposing it directly.

  5. Support self-efficacy and optimism.

Collaborative, compassionate, confidential, and curious approach to working with behaviors and perceptions that keep you from what you want.